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Mar 07

SURVIVE: Studying What You Read

Creative Commons licensed image posted at Flickr by Dustin Diaz

1. Open the following excerpt, and download it as a Word document on your computer.

2. Highlight what you think are key terms/concepts.

3. Once you’ve finished, review a sample of the same excerpt with highlights from another reader.

4. Underneath your own highlighted section, write a response to the following questions:

  • Did you highlight more than the other reader?
  • What are the benefits (and drawbacks) of highlighting more?
  • What are the benefits (and drawbacks) of highlighting less?
  • For your own study purposes, do you think you need to highlight more or less?

5. Upload your reflection and your highlighted excerpt as a document or screenshot.

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  1. John Luecke

    SURVIVE: Studying What You Read

    1. Open the following excerpt, and download it as a Word document on your computer.
    2. Highlight what you think are key terms/concepts.
    3. Once you’ve finished, review a sample of the same excerpt with highlights from another reader.
    4. Underneath your own highlighted section, write a response to the following questions:
    • Did you highlight more than the other reader?
    • What are the benefits (and drawbacks) of highlighting more?
    • What are the benefits (and drawbacks) of highlighting less?
    • For your own study purposes, do you think you need to highlight more or less?
    5. Upload your reflection and your highlighted excerpt as a document or screenshot.

    1) and 2) My Highlights
    The writing process first entered composition pedagogy conversations in the early 1960s as the “Pre-Write/Write/Re-Write” model by Gordon Rohman and the “Conception/Incubation/Production” model by James Britton et al. (Flower and Hayes 275). Originally referred to as the stage process model, “this familiar metaphor . . . describes the composing process as a linear series of stages, separated in time, and characterized by the gradual development of the written product” (Flower and Hayes 275). Later cognitive process theorists would criticize this model as too linear and too narrowly focused on the product: “the problem with stage descriptions of writing is that they model the growth of the written product, not the inner process of the person producing it” (Flower and Hayes 275). Such models were an attempt to answer what was, at the time, a call for “more research on writing itself,” but “Janet Emig’s The Composing Processes of Twelfth Graders was the first significant answer to [this] call” (Villanueva 2).
    *Google refused to allow me access to the Sample file for comparison in step 3

    4) Comments
    • Did you highlight more than the other reader?
    Unable to compare

    • What are the benefits (and drawbacks) of highlighting more?
    Highlighting more would ensure that no key points were missed.
    Highlighting more could cause you to lose focus on the most important elements.

    • What are the benefits (and drawbacks) of highlighting less?
    Highlighting less ensure that your attention is not diluted from most critical items.
    Highlighting less could prevent you from considering all pertinent points.

    • For your own study purposes, do you think you need to highlight more or less?
    I believe that I highlight correctly; enough to capture all the key elements on a quick scan, without
    becoming overwhelming in volume and losing focus on the main points.

  2. K.Marku

    Survive: Engaging what you read

  3. RosangelaB

    4. Underneath your own highlighted section, write a response to the following questions:
    • Did you highlight more than the other reader?
    I highlighted more. I find that highlighting keeps me focused on what’s going on in the book. However it can get a little difficult knowing what the most importing concepts you should highlight are and what’s not.

    • What are the benefits (and drawbacks) of highlighting more?
    It’s easy to over highlight, because at first everything just looks important. I am not sure if there is any benefits in highlighting more as this will make it difficult to go back and read on the important points. However sometimes I do find that highlighting in two different colors can help. You can highlight an entire sentence in a color and then bullet the focus points. Also if you just want to quickly look over things too much highlighting will make this hard.

    • What are the benefits (and drawbacks) of highlighting less?
    It keeps your focus points simple and easy to review, however this can sometimes get you to go back and re-read because you missed something. If you are doing it correctly than the important parst will stand out making it easy to study later.

    • For your own study purposes, do you think you need to highlight more or less?
    I believe that I need to start highlighting less.

  4. Jennifer Harrington

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Sz0dyA_3t_P54SSJntl4MJj3HiipeaF_POOgW2RwP40/edit?usp=sharing

    **Note: when I went to review the sample, it said I do not have permission to access it. I went ahead and answered the remainder of the questions anyway.

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